Genealogy Data Page 1 (Notes Pages)

For privacy reasons, Date of Birth and Date of Marriage for persons believed to still be living are not shown.

WHEATON, Eric William (b. 10 APR 1911, d. 7 JUL 1991)

Note: Birth
Birth was registered in March 1930 "by order of the Registrar General"

Addresses
1911 18 Cromwell Road, Grays, Essex
1918 Park Street, Grays, Essex
1930 26 Bellvue Place, Southend, Essex (first marriage)
1931 167 Eastern Esplanade, Southend, Essex (birth of Valerie Daphne)
1933 71 Sandringham Road, Southend, Essex (birth of Peter Ernest)
1936 166/167 Eastern Esplanade, Southend, Essex (birth of Dennis Ian)
1940 Nelson Road, Leigh-on-Sea, Essex
1940 Stonecot Hill, Morden, Surrey
50 Palmer Avenue, North Cheam Surrey
1951 13 Bhylls Crescent, Wolverhampton, Staffordshire (second marriage)
The Swan Hotel, Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire
115 Stubby Lane, Wednesfield, Staffordshire
1977 20 Banksia Court, Elizabeth Park, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
1985 F.11/4 Breamore Street, Elizabeth North, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia (death of wife)
1991 Trevu Nursing Home, 70 East Terrace, Gawler East, South Australia, Australia (death)

Steward P & O Line; Gardener; Groundsman; Parks Corporation Gardener; Chauffeur; Hotel Manager; Stocktaker; Salesman; Clerk-Brewery; Cost Clerk; Progress Clerk (Iron & Steel Works)

ERIC WILLIAM WHEATON 1911 - 1991
Eric William WHEATON was born on the 10th April 1911 at 18 Cromwell Road, Grays, Essex, the home of his mother, Beatrice JACKSON, who omitted to register her son's birth. This was not remedied until the time of Eric's marriage in 1930 when the entry in the Birth Index, and on his certificate, indicates that the information was recorded "by order of the Registrar General". His parents, Ernest WHEATON and Beatrice JACKSON, did ultimately marry in 1916, but Ernest was already in the army, the marriage took place at a dock yard church probably just before Ernest was embarking for France, where he was "missing presumed dead" in the Battle of the Somme six months later. So, Eric was brought up in Grays by his mother and her family and knew very little of his WHEATON ancestors, although, apparently he did visit his grandparents, Philip and Emma on one occasion.

In 1916 Beatrice, and probably Eric, were living in Park Street, in Grays, and in 1918, Eric's mother, Beatrice remarried to William Henry MILLER, a widower. Eric would have been about seven years old when this event took place, but it appears that he did not get on with his step-father, and as soon as he was able he became a steward on a P & O Liner on the Australian route. Whether he actually "ran away to sea" we are not certain, but the experience certainly made him, all the rest of his life, want to return to that part of the world.

By 1929 he must have returned to Essex as he and Gladys May CROSS, the youngest daughter of William and Florence (née JEWELL) CROSS were engaged in August 1929 and married in 1930. The ceremony took place at the Register Office in Rochford, Essex, witnessed by Eric's mother, Beatrice MILLER, and Harold and Lilian CROSS, brother and sister of the bride. Eric and his Gladys began their married life probably at "White Heather", a guest house situated at 167 Eastern Esplanade, Southend, Essex which was run by William CROSS and his family. Later they moved away to 71 Sandringham Road, still in Southend. Three children were born to Eric and Gladys, Valerie Daphne in 1931, Peter Ernest in 1933 and Dennis Ian in 1936. All were born at Southend Municipal Hospital in Southend, which is where Peter also died within hours of his birth of Anencephaly.

Eric and his young family had moved at some time to Nelson Road, Leigh on Sea, Essex, but at the beginning of the war, in about 1940, all those living in Southend and district were told to pack a suitcase and were given only a short time to leave the area. Whether Eric was still living in Southend at this time, or if he had already joined the forces, we are uncertain. The Company for which Lilian CROSS, the sister of Gladys May (née CROSS) WHEATON, worked, Norris Warming (ledger section) bought a property at Stonecot Hill, in Morden, Surrey in case of emergencies. This house was offered to Lilian and her sister's family, and in 1940 Gladys, the children, Valerie, Dennis, and "Aunty Lily" moved to Surrey. They eventually found another house to rent at 50 Palmer Avenue, North Cheam, Surrey.

After leaving the P & O Line and marrying Gladys, Eric had worked as a Corporation Gardener, Groundsman and Parks Gardener for Southend Council. During World War II he was in the Royal Air Force as an Airfield Controller at a fighter station. At some time during the war he was stationed in Holland and on one leave brought home a wooden letter opener, the handle of which was painted in the shape of a Dutch girl in national costume and a purse-wallet for his son, Dennis.

After the war, Eric's sister-in-law, Lilian CROSS, was able to help Eric find employment with Norris Warming Company where he became chauffeur to the Managing Director, Mr CARAMEL whose car was a Humber Super Snipe. At this time it would appear that the relationship between Eric and his wife, Gladys, was not a very happy one. As he often took Mr CARAMEL to Birmingham Eric was able to visit the home of his brother-in-law, Harold Victor CROSS, and his wife Gladys Emily (née WILLIAMS) known as Babs. We are told that the atmosphere in this home contrasted with that of his own home and made him more discontented with the situation as regards his own family. Harold CROSS died in 1948, and two years later Eric had decided to leave Cheam and make his home, with Babs CROSS in Bhylls Crescent in Wolverhampton. His son, Dennis, remained in Cheam with his mother and Aunty Lily. The knowledge that her husband had left her devastated Gladys May, and on the 22nd January 1951 she committed suicide at the house at 50 Palmer Avenue, Cheam. Just under three months later Eric and Babs were married in the Register Office in Wolverhampton with friends and relations of Babs acting as witnesses.

Some time before 1954 Eric and Babs moved to Stourport-on-Severn where they took over the running of the Swan Hotel, Eric as Manager, and Babs as Cook. Probably about 1957 they moved to 115 Stubby Lane, Wednesfield, near Wolverhampton, Staffordshire where they continued to live until 1977. Whilst there Eric had several jobs: Stocktaker, Salesman, Clerk and Cost Clerk, mainly for different Breweries. Later he was a Progress Clerk working for an Iron and Steel Works.

When he married Babs, Eric had doubled his family, as his niece and nephew, Pamela and Victor CROSS, became his step children. Whilst living in Stourport-on-Severn in 1954, Eric's daughter, Valerie, had married Harold WOOD, with her father and her brother Dennis as witnesses. Valerie and Harold provided Eric with two grandsons, Ian and Peter, before Valerie died of cancer in 1962. During her illness one or other of the two boys spent much time with their grandparents. Step-daughter, Pamela CROSS married Roger FARLEY in January 1960, and with their three sons decided in 1967 to emigrate to Australia. In 1960 son, Dennis, married Jean TERRY, and in 1963 step-son, Victor CROSS married Margaret DAVIS. These two marriages produced a total of another three grandsons and two granddaughters for Eric and Babs.

After his step-daughter, Pamela (née CROSS) FARLEY and her family had emigrated to Adelaide in Australia, Eric became more and more interested in travelling to the other side of the world again, just as he had done in the early years of his life. After much discussion, Eric and Babs also decided to emigrate and they left this country for Australia in 1977.

For most of the rest of their lives they lived at 20 Banksia Court, Elizabeth Park Adelaide. After the death of his wife in 1985 Eric moved to F.114 Breamore Street, Elizabeth North, still in Adelaide, where he spent much time with Pamela and her family. After suffering a stroke Eric eventually moved to the Trevu Nursing Home, 70 East Terrace in Gawler East, where he died on the 7th July 1991.

PENINSULAR & ORIENT (P & O) LINE
The company was begun about 160 years ago with the prime purpose of carrying the mail and once it was the largest company in the world. The early ships had black hulls and funnels and stone-coloured superstructure although this was changed in the 1930s. The flag is quartered using the royal colours of Portugal and Spain, the area to which the company first sent their mail ships. During the Spanish Civil Wars in the 1830s they were involved with both sides in the struggle for the throne, and at this time their ships, besides the mails, were carrying such cargoes as guns, troops, machinery and giraffes for London Zoo! The first passenger journey was on the 22nd August 1837 and was made by the 800-ton Don Juan although this vessel was wrecked on the return journey. However, the mail was saved, so retaining the company's reputation, and within three years they had extended their business to Egypt, and another three years later to India. For these longer runs larger ships of 2,000 tons were necessary and they had to be built to withstand the monsoon weather in the Far East. By 1845 the service reached Singapore and Hong Kong, and by 1852 the route to Australia had also been established.

Besides the mail the ships travelling east of Suez carried such goods as silks and indigo and had a near monopoly of long-distance steamer services in the far east. However, with the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 there had to be much economising and many changes to ensure the company survived. There were larger and faster ships, and two thirds of the passengers, which included civil servants, diplomats, soldiers, bankers, industrialists, missionaries and world travellers, went to India. Although originally limiting travellers to First and Second class only, in 1910 the company started carrying emigrants to Australia. Gradually the Australian routes replaced those to India as the most important and Australian passengers encouraged the introduction of games decks on board the ships.

Even before the company had started, ideas had been put forward about cruising around the Scottish coast and to Iceland. Modern-style cruises were begun in the 1880s by the Orient Line and the North of Scotland Company, both later to be taken over by P&O. The first programme of P&O First Class only cruises with shore excursions was organised by Thomas Cook in 1904; the activity became more and more popular and the company used the newest ships in the fleet. Tourist class cruises began on the 1930s, whilst cruises from Australia had begun a few years earlier.

By the 1930s the ships had become floating cities, as tall as skyscrapers and as big as mainline railway terminuses. Their machinery was as large as that of a power station enabling them to travel at 30 knots. The passengers were provided with every comfort to make them feel separated from the ocean itself. The fittings and furnishings on the ships were therefore very elaborate and very luxurious. Everything was done on a lavish scale so that the individual cabins and magnificent public rooms could be compared favourably to any stately mansion.

Apparently, Eric William WHEATON could see the masts of the liners in Tilbury Docks from his home in Grays. This encouraged him to become a steward on P&O liners on the route to Australia. Whether this actually entailed "running away to sea" we are not certain, but he could not have been very old as he had returned to land and to Essex, where he was married in 1930 when he would have been only nineteen years old.
Source: (Birth)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0300/CROSS 0300/WHEATON 0200
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Event: Type: Administration
Date: 26 SEP 1991
Occupation: Place: Steward P & O Line; Gardener; Groundsman; Parks Corporation Gardener; Chauffeur; Hotel Manager; Stocktaker; Salesman; Clerk-Brewery; Cost Clerk; Progress Clerk (Iron & Steel Works)
Will: Date: 24 OCT 1978
Place: Assets to son, stepson, stepdaughter and two grandsons, Dennis WHEATON, Victor CROSS, Pamela FARLEY née CROSS, Ian and Peter WOOD
Reference: 00002

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CROSS, Gladys May (b. 15 MAY 1911, d. 22 JAN 1951)
Note: Addresses
1911 55 Stamford Road, Kingsland, Hackney, London
1926 166/7 Eastern Esplanade, Thorpe Bay, Essex
1930 167 Eastern Esplanade, Southend, Essex (marriage)
1931 167 Eastern Esplanade, Southend, Essex (birth of Valerie Daphne)
1933 71 Sandringham Road, Southend, Essex (birth of Peter Ernest)
1936 166/167 Eastern Esplanade, Southend, Essex (birth of Dennis Ian))
1938 Nelson Road, Leigh-on-Sea, Essex
1940 Stonecot Hill, Morden, Surrey
50 Palmer Avenue, North Cheam Surrey
Source: (Death)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Education: Date: 1926
Place: Junior County Scholarship to County Secondary School, Colverstone Crescent, Dalston, Middlesex; Westliff High School, Westcliff, Essex
Event: Type: Inquest
Date: 25 JAN 1951
Place: F T Paterson, Deputy Coroner for Surrey
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: CROSS 0300/WHEATON 0300/WHEATON 0200
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Reference: 00003
Cause: Asphyxia - Coal Gas; Self Administered Suicide while balance of mind disturbed

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WHEATON, Valerie Daphne (b. 21 MAY 1931, d. 21 JUL 1962)
Note: Addresses
1931 167 Eastern Esplanade, Southend, Essex (birth)
1933 71 Sandringham Road, Southend, Essex (birth of Peter Ernest)
1936 166/167 Eastern Esplanade, Southend, Essex (birth of Dennis Ian)
1940 Nelson Road, Leigh-on-Sea, Essex
1940 Stonecot Hill, Morden, Surrey
1940 50 Palmer Avenue, North Cheam, Surrey
1954 Swan Hotel, Stourport-on-Severn Worcestershire (marriage)
???? 13 Lion Hill, Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire
1962 13 Lion Hill, Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire (death)
Source: (Birth)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Source: (Death)
Title: Death certificate
Author: Michigan Dept of Health
Publication: Vital Statistics
Note: ABBR Death CertificateCALN July 19 1947
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0200/WOOD 0200/WOOD 0101
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Occupation: Place: 1954 Grocery Shop Assistant
Reference: 00022
Cause: 1a Multiple Secondary Sarcomata due to b. Sarcoma leg

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WHEATON, Peter Ernest (b. 21 SEP 1933, d. 21 SEP 1933)
Source: (Birth)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0200
Event: Type: Informant of Death
Place: E W WHEATON, father of 71 Sandringham Road, Southend-in-Sea. Essex
Reference: 00026
Cause: Anencephaly 13 hours old

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WILLIAMS, Gladys Emily (b. 10 JUN 1910, d. 19 OCT 1985)
Note: Addresses
1951 13 Bhylls Crescent, Wolverhampton, Staffordshire
The Swan Hotel, Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire
115 Stubby Lane, Wednesfield, Staffordshire
???? The Swan Hotel, Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire
???? 115 Stubby Lane, Wednesfield, Staffordshire
1977 20 Banksia Court, Elizabeth Park, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

Gladys CROSS née WILLIAMS (known as Babs) was married to Harold CROSS, brother of Eric William WHEATON's first wife. Harold and Gladys had two children, Pamela and Victor. Pamela married Roger FARLEY and had three children, Neil, Nicholas and David. Victor married three times, and by his first wife Margaret had Stuart, Nicholas and Deborah
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: CROSS 0300/WHEATON 0300/WHEATON 0200
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Occupation: Place: Hotel Cook
Reference: 00027

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WHEATON, Ernest (b. 29 JUN 1893, d. 3 JUL 1916)
Note: Addresses
1893 8 Rylston Terrace, Fulham, Middlesex (birth)
1895 23 Lizban Street, Blackheath, London (birth of Ada)
1897 25 Maple Road, Grays, Essex (birth of Minnie)
1901 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1907 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Grays, Essex (birth of William Alphonso and Frank)
1911 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1916 2 Whitehall Road, Grays, Essex (death)

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919
about Ernest WHEATON Name:
Ernest WHEATON
Birth Place: Fulham, Middlesex
Residence: Grays
Death Date: 3 Jul 1916
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Grays
Rank: L Corporal
Regiment: Essex Regiment
Battalion: 9th Battalion
Regimental Number: 23901
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

ERNEST WHEATON, 1893 - 1916
Most of the information about Ernest was told to us by Kenneth and Gladys SLACK and the late Mrs Min FIELD
Ernest WHEATON was born on the 29th June 1893 at 8 Rylston Terrace, Fulham, Middlesex. He was actually the third son of Philip and Emma but both boys had died, Phillip within thirty minutes of his birth, and the first Ernest in 1891 at the age of twenty one months.

When he was born Ernest already had two sisters, Florence and Ada (known as Bob), and another sister, Minnie (Min) was born two years later. Ernest had to wait another ten years for a brother when twins William Alphonso and Frank were born, but Frank died within hours and William was blind. There was also the ten year gap in their ages, so probably Ernest would have found it difficult to play "boys games" with William.

Ernest did not grow up in Fulham where he was born as the family had moved to Blackheath by 1895, and then to different addresses in Grays, Essex.

His sister, Min, remembered Ernest as being very kind, and in particular recalls a blue elastic beaded bracelet which he gave her as a birthday present.

BATTLE OF THE SOMME
The 9th Battalion of the Essex Regiment was the first of the Service or "Kitchener" Battalions to be especially recruited for the war and it was formed on the 26th August 1914 at Risborough Barracks, Shorncliffe. The C.O, Adjutant and several officers and N.C.Os were from the Regular Essex Regiment so a "valuable spirit was unstilled" in the men at an early stage. By the 9th September the Battalion was 2,000 strong and half of the men were then used to form the 10th Battalion although as groups of friends had enlisted together, official thinking was that they should stay together. In February 1915 the Battalion marched in stages from Shorncliffe to Aldershot via Ashford, Maidstone, Sevenoaks, Redhill, Leatherhead and Woking arriving in Aldershot on the 1st May 1915. Here the Battalion spent a month completing its musketry training and left the U.K. for Boulogne on the 29th May. In June the Battalion was inducted into trench warfare in easy stages and took its first tour of front line duty on the 7th July. Ernest WHEATON survived the Battle of Loos in September 1915, and the "scrap" at the Craters of Noyelles in March 1916, but he fell on the third day of the Somme Battles.

Ovillers la Boisselle is a village, just north of the Amiens to Bapaume road and to the east of Albert. It was protected by rising ground and parapets which were part of the enemy's powerful preparations. There were three Brigades in the attack and it was considered that success could only be achieved if all made progress at the same time. To "prepare" the Germans for the battle ahead their lines were bombarded for eight days before the first British advance.

On the 1st July 1916 the 9th Battalion of the Essex Regiment was held in reserve at Hénencourt Wood. Meanwhile the attack had began early as the final bombardment was just before 7.30 a.m. At that time a brigade began crossing no man's land, which in places was about eight hundred yards wide, to be met by appalling gun fire. The first wave of soldiers managed to reach the German lines, but in the face of the heavy German gunfire, they were held back, and so became mixed up with several of the following waves of men. In the confusion the British soldiers were driven out of the German lines. A second brigade were caught in cross fire and had to withdraw several times. Similarly the third brigade was unable to make progress, losing many of their leading officers.

Ernest worked as an overhead crane driver at the Globe Works where his father also worked. Their lunch used to be taken to them by Min, who had to climb the steps of the crane to reach them. When there, Ernest would show her the controls and teach her how to work the crane!

He was a keen footballer and played for Grays Athletics. One particular occasion is well remembered when they played the boys on the training ship, the s.s."Exmouth". It is not recalled because of the score, but because Ernest broke his leg.

At some time before 1911 Ernest met Beatrice JACKSON, and their son, Eric William WHEATON was born on the 10th April of that year, although his birth was not registered until 1930. In his early years Eric was brought up by his mother's family, and was known to the WHEATON children as Eric JACKSON. However, the families must have been friendly as Ernest's sister, Priscilla, was engaged to Harold JACKSON.

At the beginning of the war Min worked as a housemaid and her employer frequently asked her about her brother Ernest, mentioning the war, talking about enlisting, and referring to the issuing of white feathers. Min passed the comments on to her brother Ernest who, despite his mother trying to persuade him to stay at home, enlisted in Grays, Essex.

By 1916 he was Private 23901 in the III Essex Regiment. It is probable that he was on the point of embarking for France when on the 15 January 1916, at St Mark, Victoria Docks, West Ham, Essex, he married Beatrice by licence. The witnesses to the marriage were probably her father, Alfred JACKSON, and her sister Mabel CROUCH. Six months later, having been promoted to Lance Corporal in the 9th Battalion of the Essex Regiment, and having fought in France and Flanders, Ernest was killed on the 3 July 1916, probably on the first day his regiment was involved in the Battle of the Somme.

Emma, Ernest's mother was of course very bitter when the telegram from the War Office arrived stating that Ernest was missing presumed killed, one telegram which was soon followed by another reporting the death of Harold JACKSON. Ernest was not found, and his name is on the Thiepval Memorial in the Anglo-French Cemetery in France.

A day later the 9th Battalion of the Essex Regiment moved up to the front line and although there was no attack Ovillers was still bombarded in order that the enemy would think that an advance was imminent. However, it is thought that the German forces either withdrew from their trenches, or sat safely in strong, deeply cut, dugouts.

The attack toward Ovillers on the 3rd July began at 2.15 a.m. where the targets were the same as on the 1st. The digging of trenches in no man's land had been carried out in the time between the two attacks in an attempt to lessen the distance between the two armies. The 35th Brigade (of which Ernest was a part) was to the right "with the 6th R Berks. and 7th Suffolks in front and on their left was the 37 Bde. with the 6th Queen's and 6th R.W. Kents. The extreme left of the Division's line was held by the 36th Bde. who were to cover the flank with the help of a smoke discharge." The men began their advance about 3.15 a.m. (when our First World War expert thinks Ernest was probably killed). By 9 a.m. it was being reported that the attack had failed. The reasons for the failure were later given as inadequate flank protection and the lack of surprise.

On the 3rd July there was 2mm of rain, the temperature was between 55 and 68 degrees, and there were thunderstorms around.

This is the day on which it is estimated that a total of 60,000 men lost their lives, one of them being Ernest WHEATON, so he obviously took no part in subsequent events. On the 8th July the Battalion was in action again, and advanced two hundred yards but lost their Commanding Officer, Major C I RYAN. This event was followed by a withdrawal to Albert-Bouzincourt on the 9th, and following action on the 10th, 11th, 21st, 22nd, 25th, 26th and 30th July, the Battalion were again back in Albert-Bouzincourt on the 8th August. The Battalion continued to see action in various sectors until the 22nd October. The Battle ended on the 18th November when the armies were faced by the onset of winter and exhaustion. In all the Battle of the Somme lasted 140 days and a total of 400,000 men were killed, 125,000 of them from all parts of the British Empire as well as the United Kingdom.

By the time it was possible to search for the missing all traces of 72,085 men who had died in this particular sector of the battlefield were lost. Over 9064763614f the names on the Thiepval memorial to the missing are men who lost their lives from July to November 1916. In addition to the memorial there are three hundred French and three hundred British graves in the Anglo-French cemetery. The monument stands in 40 acres of ground, on a ridge overlooking the battlefield, and is the largest built by the War Graves Commission. It was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and is 150 feet high. It is mainly built of brick, but the sixteen piers on which the names are engraved are of Portland stone. "It was built between 1928 and 1932 and was unveiled by the Prince of Wales in the presence of the President of France on the 31st July 1932."

Paul WHEATON, the great grandson of Ernest, and Lorraine (now his wife) visited the memorial. It can be seen from quite a distance, and Paul has taken a considerable number of photographs as they approached the site, until he was able to take one of the name of Ernest WHEATON.

Information from Forces War Records Site sent by John TERRY 15/10/2014

First Name: Ernest
Initials: E
Surname: WHEATON
Birth Town: Fulham, Middlesex
Resided Town: Grays
Nationality: British
Date of Death: 03/07/1916
Fate: Killed in Action
Rank: Lance Corporal
Service Number: 23701
Duty Location: France And Flanders

Campaign Medals:
Victory Medal

Given the information we have available it is likely that Ernest WHEATON was entitled to the Victory medal, also called the Inter Allied Victory Medal. This medal was awarded to all who received the 1914 Star or 1914-15 Star and, with certain exceptions, to those who received the British War Medal. It was never awarded alone. These three medals were sometimes irreverently referred to as Pip, Squeak and Wilfred.

Eligibility for this award consisted of having been mobilised, fighting, having served in any of the theatres of operations, or at sea, between midnight 4th/5th August, 1914, and midnight, 11th/12th November, 1918. Women who served in any of the various military organisations in a theatre of operations were also eligible.

British War Medal

From the information available to us, it is very possible that Ernest WHEATON was entitled to the British War Medal for service in World War One. This British Empire campaign medal was issued for services between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918.

The medal was automatically awarded in the event of death on active service before the completion of this period.

Essex Regiment
Essex Regiment during World War 1
Since 1815 the balance of power in Europe had been maintained by a series of treaties. In 1888 Wilhelm II was crowned ‘German Emperor and King of Prussia’ and moved from a policy of maintaining the status quo to a more aggressive position. He did not renew a treaty with Russia, aligned Germany with the declining Austro-Hungarian Empire and started to build a Navy rivalling that of Britain. These actions greatly concerned Germany’s neighbours, who quickly forged new treaties and alliances in the event of war. On 28th June 1914 Franz Ferdinand the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne was assassinated by the Bosnian-Serb nationalist group Young Bosnia who wanted pan-Serbian independence. Franz Joseph's the Austro-Hungarian Emperor (with the backing of Germany) responded aggressively, presenting Serbia with an intentionally unacceptable ultimatum, to provoke Serbia into war. Serbia agreed to 8 of the 10 terms and on the 28th July 1914 the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia, producing a cascade effect across Europe. Russia bound by treaty to Serbia declared war with Austro-Hungary, Germany declared war with Russia and France declared war with Germany. Germany’s army crossed into neutral Belgium in order to reach Paris, forcing Britain to declare war with Germany (due to the Treaty of London (1839) whereby Britain agreed to defend Belgium in the event of invasion). By the 4th August 1914 Britain and much of Europe were pulled into a war which would last 1,566 days, cost 8,528,831 lives and 28,938,073 casualties or missing on both sides.

The Regiment raised 30 Battalions and was awarded 62 Battle Honours and 1 Victoria Crosse, losing 8,860 men during the course of the war.

1st Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Mauritius.
Dec 1914 Returned to England and moved to Harwich, Essex.
18.01.1915 Moved to Banbury to join the 88th Brigade of the 29th Division.
05.03.1915 Moved to Warwick.
21.03.1915 Embarked at for Gallipoli from Avonmouth via Alexandria and Mudros.
25.04.1915 Landed at Gallipoli and engaged in various actions against the Turkish Army including;
1915
First Battle of Krithia, the Second Battle of Krithia, the Third Battle of Krithia, the Battle of Gully Ravine, the Battle of Krithia Vineyard, the Battle of Scimitar Hill.
08.01.1916 Evacuated from Gallipoli to Egypt due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather.
16.03.1916 Embarked for France from Alexandria arriving at Marseilles and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges,
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The Battle of Cambrai.
04.02.1918 Transferred to the 112th Brigade of the 37th Division;
1918
The Battle of the Ancre, The Battle of the Albert, The Battle of Havrincourt, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Bethencourt N.W. of Le Cateau, France.

2nd Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Chatham as part of the 12th Brigade of the 4th Division and then moved to Cromer, Norwich and Harrow.
24.08.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre, transferring to the 12th Brigade of the 36th Division.
05.11.1915 – 03.02.1916 attached to the 109th Brigade of the same Division, initially concentrated around Flesselles and attached to the 4th Division for trench familiarisation and training.
03.02.1916 Returned to the 12th Brigade, Division took over the front line section between the River Ancre and the Mailly-Maillet to Serre road and engaged in various actions including;
The Battle of Albert.
1917
The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Langemarck, The Cambrai Operations, The capture of Bourlon Wood.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Actions at the Somme Crossings, The Battle of Rosieres, The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle of Kemmel Ridge, The Battle of Ypres, The Battle of Courtrai, The action of Ooteghem.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Artres south of Valenciennes, France.

3rd (Reserve) Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Warley and then moved to Harwich.
Mar 1916 Moved to Felixstowe.

1/4th & 1/5th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 The 1/4th stationed at Brentwood and the 1/5th stationed at Chelmsford both as part of the Essex Brigade of the East Anglian Division and then moved to Norwich.
April 1915 Moved to Colchester and the formation became the 161st Brigade of the 54th Division and then moved to At Albans.
21.07.1915 Embarked for the Mediterranean from Devonport via Lemnos.
12.08.1915 Landed at Suvla Bay and engaged in various actions against the Turkish Army.
04.12.1915 Evacuated from Gallipoli to Mudros due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather.
17.12.1915 Deployed to Alexandria;
1916
Suez Canal Defence
1917
The First Battle of Gaza, The Second Battle of Gaza, The Third Battle of Gaza, The Capture of Gaza, The Battle of Jaffa.
1918
The fight at Ras el'Ain, The operations at Berukin, The Battle of Sharon.

31.10.1918 Ended the war near Beirut, Palestine.

1/6th & 1/7th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 The 1/6th stationed at West Ham and the 1/7th stationed at Walthamstow both as part of the Essex Brigade of the East Anglian Division and then moved to Norwich.
April 1915 Moved to Colchester and the formation became the 161st Brigade of the 54th Division and then moved to At Albans.
21.07.1915 Embarked for the Mediterranean from Devonport, Plymouth via Lemnos.
12.08.1915 Landed at Suvla Bay and engaged in various actions against the Turkish Army.
04.12.1915 Evacuated from Gallipoli to Mudros due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather.
17.12.1915 Deployed to Alexandria
1916
Suez Canal Defence
1917
The First Battle of Gaza, The Second Battle of Gaza, The Third Battle of Gaza, The Capture of Gaza, The Battle of Jaffa.
1918
The fight at Ras el'Ain, The operations at Berukin, The Battle of Sharon.
31.10.1918 Ended the war near Beirut, Palestine.

1/8th (Cyclist) Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Colchester and then moved to Essex and stationed at H.Q. at Wivenhoe.
Jan 1917 Moved to Southminster attached to the 73rd Division.
Oct 1917 Moved to Margate.
Feb 1918 Moved to Ireland at Enniskillen.
Mar 1918 Moved to Curragh then Tulla Co. Clare.
Oct 1918 Moved to Naas Co. Kildare.

2/4th Battalion Territorial Force
Oct 1914 Formed at Brentwood and then moved to Stamford as part of the 206th Brigade of the 69th Division.
Jan 1915 Moved to Yarmouth and then Thetford.
Dec 1915 Disbanded.

2/5th & 2/6th Battalion Territorial Force
Oct 1914 The 2/5th formed at Chelmsford.
Nov 1914 The 2/6th formed at West Ham and then both moved to Peterborough as part of the 206th Brigade of the 69th Division and then Thetford.
July 1916 Moved to Harrogate.
April 1917 Moved to Welbeck and then Middlesbrough.
Mar 1918 Disbanded.

2/7th Battalion Territorial Force
Nov 1914 Formed at Walthamstow and then moved to Peterborough as part of the 206th Brigade of the 69th Division and then Thetford.
July 1916 Moved to Harrogate.
April 1917 Moved to Welbeck.
10.10.1917 Moved to Ramsgate and transferred to the 201st brigade of the 67th Division
Mar 1918 Disbanded.

2/8th (Cyclist) Battalion Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Formed at Colchester.
Mar 1915 Moved to Great Clacton and then moved to Mistley & Manningtree.
Aug 1916 Moved to Foxhall Heath, Ipswich and then Faversham.
April 1917 Moved to Little Clacton and then Hollesley Bay, Suffolk.
April 1918 Moved to Bawdsey attached to the 67th Division.

3/4th 3/5th 3/6th & 3/7th Battalion Territorial Force
May 1915 Formed at Brentwood, Chelmsford, West Ham & Walthamstow and then moved to Windsor Great Park.
Oct 1915 Moved to Halton Park.
08.04.1916 Became the 4th 5th 6th & 7th Reserve Battalions.
01.09.1916 The 4th absorbed the rest as part of the East Anglian Reserve Battalion.
Aug 1917 Moved to Crowborough.
Aug 1918 Moved to Hastings.

3/8th (Cyclist) Battalion Territorial Force
April 1915 Formed at Colchester.
April 1916 Disbanded.

9th (Service) Battalion
Aug 1914 Formed at Warley and then moved to Shorncliffe as part of the 35th Brigade of the 12th Division.
Mar 1915 Moved to Blenheim Barracks, Aldershot.
31.05.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1915
The Battle of Loos.
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Le Transloy.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Cambrai operations.
1918
The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras 1918, The Battle of Amiens, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Epehy, The Final Advance in Artois.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Hergnies east of Orchies, France.

10th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Warley and then moved to Shorncliffe as part of the 53rd Brigade of the 18th Division and then moved to Colchester.
Mar 1915 Moved to Codford St. Mary.
26.07.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Thiepval Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The Battle of the Ancre.
1917
Operations on the Ancre, The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck, First Battle of Passchendaele, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of the Avre, The actions of Villers-Brettoneux, The Battle of Amiens, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Epehy, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Le Cateau, France.

11th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Warley as part of the Third New Army (K3) and then moved to Shoreham to join the 71st Brigade of the 24th Division.
Jan 1915 Moved to Brighton and then back to Shoreham and then Blackdown.
30.08.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne.
11.10.1915 Transferred to the 71st Brigade of the 6th Division.
27.10.1915 Transferred to the 18th Brigade of the 6th Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1916
The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval, The Battle of Le Transloy.
1917
The Battle of Hill 70, The Cambrai operations
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle of Kemmel Ridge, The Second Battle of Kemmel Ridge, The Advance in Flanders, The Battle of Epehy, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of Beaurevoir, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 ended the war at Becquigny north of Bohain, France.

12th (Reserve) Battalion
26.10.1914 Formed at Harwich as a service battalion of the Fourth New Army (K4) as part of the 106th Brigade of the 35th Division.
Jan 1915 Moved to White City, London.
10.04.1915 Became the 2nd Reserve Battalion and then moved to Colchester.
Mar 1916 Moved back to Harwich as part of the 6th Reserve Brigade.
01.09.1916 Absorbed into the Training Reserve Battalion.

13th (Service) Battalion (West Ham)
27.12.1914 Formed by the Mayor and the Borough at West Ham and then moved to Brentwood.
01.07.1915 Taken over by the War Office and the then moved to Clipstone as part of the 100th Brigade of the 33rd Division and then moved to Perham Down, Salisbury Plain.
17.11.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne
22.12.1915 Transferred to the 6th Brigade of the 2nd Division and moved to Bethune and engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1916
The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of the Ancre, Operations on the Ancre.
1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Cambrai.
10.02.1918 Disbanded in France.

14th (Reserve) Battalion
Sept 1915 Formed as a local Reserve Battalion from the depot companies of the 13th Battalion at Brentwood.
July 1915 Moved to Cambridge and then to Colchester as part of the 23rd Reserve Brigade.
Jan 1916 Moved to Northampton and then Tweseldown, Aldershot.
01.09.1916 became the 98th Training Reserve Battalion of the 23rd Reserve Brigade.

15th Battalion Territorial Force
01.01.1917 Formed at Yarmouth from the 65th Provisional Battalion as part of the 225th Brigade.
27.04.1918 Became a Garrison Guard Battalion.
May 1918 Mobilised for war and landed in France.
12.05.1918 Transferred to the 177th Brigade of the 59th Division
16.07.1918 The title of ‘Garrison’ dropped and engaged in various actions including;
The general final advance in Artois and Flanders
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Grand Rejet north of Tournai, Belgium.

16th Battalion Territorial Force
01.01.1917 Formed at Fleet from the 66th Provisional Battalion as part of the 213th Brigade of the 77th Division.
Mar 1917 Moved to Colchester.
Dec 1917 Disbanded.

17th Battalion Territorial Force
01.01.1917 Formed at Sheringham from the 67th Provisional Battalion as part of the 223rd Brigade.
July 1917 Moved to Weybourne where it remained.

18th (Home service) Battalion
27.04.1918 formed at Yarmouth to replace the 15th Battalion of the 225th Brigade.

1st Garrison Battalion
21.07.1915 Formed at Denham, Buckingham
24.08.1915 Embarked for Gallipoli from Devonport via Mudros arriving 03.09.1915
Feb 1916 Evacuated from Gallipoli to Egypt due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather.
Remained in Egypt until the end of the war.

2nd Garrison Battalion
Jan 1916 Formed at Halton Park and then deployed to India where it remained.

Click here for more information on Essex Regiment

Battalion: 9th Battalion
Commemorated: Britain
Collections: Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914-1919
Source: (Birth)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Source: (Burial)
Title: War Graves Website
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0400/JACKSON 0400/WHEATON 0300
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Occupation: Place: 1911 Electrical Traveller Driver Machine; Crane Driver (Public Works)
Reference: 00004
Cause: Missing assumed dead in the Battle of the Somme

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JACKSON, Beatrice (b. 18 JUL 1893, d. 6 MAY 1941)
Note: Addresses
1893 2 Lawn Place, Little Thurrock, Essex (birth)
1901 122 William Street, Grays, Thurrock, Essex
1911 78 Cromwell Road, Grays, Thurrock, Essex
1911 18 Cromwell Road, Grays, Essex (marriage to Ernest WHEATON)
1916 67 Parkes Street, Grays, Essex (death of Ernest)
1918 Grays, Thurrock, Essex (marriage to William Henry MILLER)
1930 26 Bellvue Place, Southend-on-Sea, Essex
(registration of birth of Eric by order of the Registrar General)
1941 23 Ridgeway, Grays, Essex (death)

Beatrice WHEATON née JACKSON married William Henry MILLER on the 31st August 1918. William had been married before and had children by his first wife.
Source: (Name)
Title: Birth Certificate
Source: (Death)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: JACKSON 0400/WHEATON 0400/WHEATON 0300
Event: Type: Informant of Death
Place: E W WHEATON son of 50 Palmer Avenue, Cheam, Surrey
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Occupation: Place: 1911 School
Reference: 00005
Cause: Carcinoma of Gall Bladder

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WHEATON, Philip (b. 15 MAY 1863, d. 1 NOV 1948)
Note: Philip WHEATON was registered as John. He had an older brother of this name, born two years previously and we assume their father was confused! When Philip retired he had many problems as he needed his birth certificate so that he could obtain a pension.

Addresses
1863 Somersham, Huntingdonshire
1864 Somersham, Huntingdonshire (baptism)
1871 Squire Lane, Somersham, Huntingdonshire
1881 Woolvey/Wolby Farm, Warboys, Huntingdonshire,
Farm Servant to George WITSEY, wife and 2 daughters
1884 Enfield, Middlesex with cousin Philip (marriage)
1884 Warboys, Huntingdonshire (birth and death of Philip)
1887 Warboys, Huntingdonshire (birth of Florence)
1889 Warboys, Huntingdonshire (birth of first Ernest)
1889-1891
Burrard Road, Hampstead, Middlesex
1891 38 Burrard Road, Hampstead, Middlesex (RG12/114 folio 59 page 41)
Also in same property were:
Robert UTTERIDGE, his wife (both from Warboys) and their son
John LAWRENCE from Warboys, and
Thomas WHEATON, brother of Philip, with his wife and 4 children
1891 20 Protheroe Road, Fulham, Middlesex (birth of Priscilla)
1893 8 Rylston Terrace, Fulham, Middlesex (birth of second Ernest)
1895 23 Lizban Street, Blackheath, London (birth of Ada)
1897 25 Maple Road, Grays, Essex (birth of Minnie)
1901 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1907 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex (birth of William Alphonso and Frank)
1911 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1919 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex (marriage of Priscilla)
? 229 Rectory Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1925/26 Rectory Road, Little Thurrock, Essex (Kelly's Directory)
1940/45 Warboys, Huntingdonshire (stayed with relatives during the war)
1945/48 8 Roy Walk, Blackshots Estate, Little Thurrock, Essex

Occupations
1871 Fieldwork; 1881 Farm Servant; 1884 Farm Labourer (marriage); 1887 Agricultural Labourer (birth of Florence); 1891 Fixed Engine Driver, Builder's Engine Driver; 1889 Engine Driver for Grinding Mortar birth of first Ernest); 1893 Stationary Engine Driver (birth of second Ernest) , 1895 Stationary Engine Driver (birth of Ada), 1897 Stationary Engine Driver (birth of Minnie) ; 1901 Engine Driver Globe Works, Iron & Steel Sawyer M Mach, Traction Engine Driver; 1907 Engine Driver for Building Contractor (birth of William Alphone and Frank); 1911 Plater and Fitter; 1919 Engineer's Fitter (marriage of Priscilla); 1920 Engineer (first marriage of Minnie); 1921 Engine Driver (marriage of Ada); 1930 Stoker (second marriage of Minnie); 1948 Engine Driver retired (death); 1950 Maintenance Fitter dcd (death of widow); 1953 Stoker (Engineering Works) dcd (death of Florence)


PHILLIP WHEATON 1863 - 1948
Much of the information about Philip and Emma was told to us mainly by Kenneth and Gladys SLACK, and also the late Mrs Min FIELD. We are very grateful to them for all their help and interest.

Phillip (or Philip) WHEATON was born in Somersham, Huntingdonshire on the 15th May 1863. He was William and Ann's ninth child, and sixth son, although one son and two daughters had died before Philip was born. When Philip's father registered the birth he gave the registrar the name of John for his new son, although this name had been given to a child born two years previously. This mistake caused Philip problems later in his life when he applied for a pension!

William and Ann were not all that prompt in having their children baptised and the new baby was one and a half years old when he was given the correct name of Philip in the church of St John the Baptist in Somersham on the 11th December 1864.

In 1861 the WHEATON family were living in Main Street South Side in Somersham, but by 1871 had moved to Squire Lane (now Parkhall Road). Philip was already at work at the age of eight, engaged in "Field Work" and by 1881 he was lodging at the Woolvey Farm in Warboys where he was a Farm Servant.

Woolvey Farm is just over the hill from the village of Warboys itself where Emma HYDE lived with her family in the High Street. Perhaps the couple had met whilst walking in the fields between the village and Woolvey Farm. However, before they married, it is probable that in 1884 Philip had either moved to Enfield in Middlesex, or was staying there with a cousin, another Philip, son of Robert and Margaret (née PARKER) WHEATON. Nevertheless, "our" Philip obviously returned to Warboys because on the 29th July 1884 Philip and Emma HYDE were married in the church of St Mary Magdalene in Warboys, Huntingdonshire with Emma's sister Annie and Annie's future husband, John LAWRENCE as witnesses.

At this time Philip was still working as a Farm, or Agricultural Labourer and the couple were living in Warboys where a few months after their marriage their first child was born prematurely, living for only half an hour. In 1887 a daughter, Florence was born, and two years later, a son Ernest. It must have been about this time that Philip decided that farm work in Warboys was not going to make his fortune so he walked to London to see if he could find work there. It would seem that Emma and the children must have followed soon after for the baby, Ernest, died at twenty-one months of congestion of the lungs and acute bronchitis at Burrard Road, Hampstead, Middlesex in January 1891.

Philip's brother Thomas, and his wife's future brother-in-law, John LAWRENCE may have accompanied him to London because in April 1891 Philip, Emma and their daughter, Florence, were still at 38 Burrard Road, and also living in the same property were Thomas and his wife and family, and John LAWRENCE, all from Warboys. Philip did not stay long in Hampstead, however, as by the August of the same year, when daughter Priscilla was born, the family had moved to 20 Protheroe Road, Fulham, to be followed by yet another move by 1893 when at the time of the birth of Ernest they were at 8 Rylston Terrace, still in Fulham. Again, they did not stay long at that address for in 1895 the family were as 23 Lizban Street for the birth of another daughter, Ada (known as "Bob").

Lizban Road was in Blackheath, Kent, where they had moved with "Aunty Ginny and Bob" so the family were gradually moving out of London, and they moved even further when Philip found out that the building of houses had begun in Whitehall Road in Grays, in Essex for he was able to obtain the first plot. In 1897, whilst they were waiting for the Whitehall house to be built they lived at 25 Maple Road where another daughter, Minnie, was born.

It was at this address, ten years later, that Emma had her last children. During her pregnancy Emma had a miscarriage but she was told that a baby remained. There were, however, two babies who were born two months early on the evening of the 13 January 1907. Both were not very strong and Frank died two days later. Philip and Emma thought there was something wrong with their other baby, William Alphonso, and held the baby up to lights and lanterns to test his sight before they found he had been born blind. It was thought he would not survive but Emma carried him around in her apron and a year later he was strong enough to have an eye removed. William grew up to play the piano and to have a beautiful voice.

Life must have been very hard for Emma, for besides having to bring up a blind baby, their first born daughter, Florence, was backward. Emma would not let her go to school, and instead looked after her, and taught her at home. And, as well as looking after her growing family Emma was also a Dressmaker, advertising in local Directories for many years. Her youngest daughter, Min, can remember helping pick up the pins, putting them in a pin cushion, threading needles and whipping seams as her mother worked. Emma used to make Min's clothes. Annie (née HYDE) LAWRENCE worked in a factory in Kettering and used to provide the tweed material. Min could remember a fawn light summer-weight coat with a mock ocelot collar and cloche hat. Emma was very strong willed and ambitious. She was nervous of noises, and her husband called her a "messer". Emma used to take Min to Kettering, together with her own mother, Rebecca (née MARSHALL) HYDE, to see other members of the family. There they met Uncle Jack HYDE and George "with the apples". Emma also used to take the family to the fair, also with Gran-Becky who wore a black bonnet decorated with violets. Gran-Becky was also there at Christmas time when the meat was carved on the table. Min's memories of the home in Grays included a kitchen range, and a leather sofa with buttons.

Whilst living at Whitehall Road, Emma saw that land was for sale in Rectory Road. Two men were selling 1½ acres so she sent her daughter, Min, to the Globe Works where Philip was working and when he returned they went to the agents, Pearson and Sons in Orsett Road, Grays for the land, and to the Co-op Building Society for a loan!

Although the plans were properly drawn up, it was Philip who designed the bungalow that was to be built on the land at 229 Rectory Road. In addition he was his own bricklayer and carpenter, collecting the timber from a yard in Barking where the merchant would provide the wood for the window frames and doors according to the information on the plan. Philip pebble-dashed the outside of the bungalow with the help of Min. When the chimney was finished off they flew the Union Jack and called the bungalow Colne Villa, probably to bring back memories of life in Huntingdonshire.

The garden had to be productive and it was planted with peas (again with Min's help). There was a stall in the field from which they sold their produce while Philip, accompanied by Bill (William), would take the vegetables he grew to market in baskets on a Coster Cart drawn by a spirited pony called Molly. Previously Philip had visited Romford Market with a rope and bought the Dartmoor pony intending to lead it home. However, the rope broke, so he had to ride her instead.

Philip was a hard worker all his life. He was a very patient and contented man, a "sober sides" and a good provider. When in Grays, Essex he worked at the Globe Works as a stationary engine driver for £2. 10s. 0d a week. When he went to work he used to take a pint jug of beer, bread and cheese and a pickled onion.

On Sundays he used to go out with his pals and Emma used to have "a pleasant Sunday afternoon" at a meeting for Mothers and Children although on all but one occasion she was at home, where Philip expected her to be, on his return. Sometimes, after being out with his friends, Philip would come home rather merry, but one day he listened to the Salvation Army and from that Sunday he gave up drink until he gave up work. Something he suffered from for some time was digestive problems, but found a cure when he eventually had his one remaining tooth out!

Philip and Emma's first grandson, Eric William, was born in 1911 to Ernest and Beatrice JACKSON. Ernest was "missing presumed dead" in the Battle of the Somme, six months after marrying Beatrice at St Mark's Church at Victoria Dock, West Ham, Essex. Although brought up by his mother and her family, Eric WHEATON, the son of Ernest, knew that Philip and Emma were his grandparents, and it was whilst they were at Rectory Road that he went to see them. They were very proud of him, and glad that he had visited them.

After the war Priscilla, Minnie and "Bob" all married leaving Florence and William at home with their parents. During the Second World War Philip, Emma, Florence and William went to stay in Warboys with their relatives, the BLACKMANs and the HYDEs. When they returned to Grays they lived at 2 Roy Walk, a "prefab" on the Blackshots Estate, Little Thurrock. It was at this address that Philip died in November 1948, and then Emma, two years later in December 1950.
Source: (Name)
Title: 1871 Somersham
Source: (Name)
Title: 1881 Warboys, Huntingdonshire
Source: (Name)
Title: 1891 Hampstead, Middlesex
Source: (Name)
Title: 1871 Somersham, Huntingdonshire
Media: Book
Source: (Birth)
Title: Certificate in the name "John"
Source: (Death)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0500/HYDE 0500/WHEATON 0400
Event: Type: Informant of Death
Place: A daughter, 229 Rectory Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Occupation: Place: See Notes
Reference: 00006
Cause: Cerebral Haemorrhage, Arteriosclerosis, Senility

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WHEATON, Philip (b. 10 SEP 1884, d. 10 SEP 1884)
Source: (Birth)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0400
Event: Type: Present at death
Place: Philip WHEATON, father of Warboys, Huntingdonshire
Reference: 00033
Cause: Premature Birth, lived 30 minutes

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WHEATON, Florence (Victoria) (b. 23 MAR 1887, d. 24 MAR 1953)
Note: Addresses
1887, 1889 Warboys, Huntingdonshire
1891 38 Burrard Road, Hampstead, Middlesex
1891 20 Protheroe Road, Fulham, Middlesex (RG12/114 folio 59 page 41)
1893 8 Rylston Terrace, Fulham, Middlesex (birth of Ernest)
1895 23 Lizban Street, Blackheath, London (birth of Ada)
1897 25 Maple Road, Grays, Essex (birth of Minnie)
1901 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1907 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex (birth of William Alphonso and Frank)
1911 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1919 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex( marriage of Priscilla)
? 229 Rectory Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1940/45 Warboys, Huntingdonshire (stayed with relatives during the war)
1945 8 Roy Walk, Blackshots Estate, Little Thurrock, Essex
? 22 Ashburn Place, Kensington, London
Source: (Name)
Title: 1891 Hampstead, Middlesex
Source: (Birth)
Title: Certificate in the name "Florence"
Source: (Death)
Title: Certificate in the name "Florence Victoria"
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0400
Event: Type: Informant of Death
Place: J W FIELD, Brother-in-Law of 40 Laurel Avenue, Potters Bar, Middlesex
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Reference: 00034
Cause: Coronary Thrombosis, Arteriosclerosis

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WHEATON, Priscilla (b. 15 AUG 1891, d. 3 SEP 1979)
Note: Addresses
1891 20 Protheroe Road, Fulham, Middlesex (birth)
1893 8 Rylston Terrace, Fulham, Middlesex (birth of Ernest)
1895 23 Lizban Street, Blackheath, London (birth of Ada)
1897 25 Maple Road, Grays, Essex (birth of Minnie)
1901 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1907 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex (birth of William Alphonso and Frank)
1911 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1919 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex (First marriage)
1919 Canada
1929 Priscilla must have made a trip back to England and arrived back in Montreal,
Canada on 18th November 1929 on the "Ascania"
1948
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960 about Priscilla JOHNSON
Name: Priscilla JOHNSON
Gender: Female
Age: 57
Birth Date: abt 1891
Departure Date: 19 Oct 1948
Port of Departure: Southampton, England
Destination Port: Halifax, Canada
Ship Name: Aquitania
Search Ship Database: Search the 'Aquitania' in the 'Passenger Ships and Images' database
Shipping Line: Cunard White Star Limited
Official Number: 135538
Master: H Grattidge
Address given: 2 Roy Walk, Highfield Gardens, Grays, Essex (this was the home of her sister Ada)
Source: (Birth)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Source: (Individual)
Title: John TERRY's web site 8/1/2015
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0400
Emigration: Date: 20 MAY 1919
Place: departed Liverpool on the "Minnedosa" arrived 20th May 1919 Quebec Canada
Reference: 00035

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WHEATON, Ada "Bob" (b. 6 SEP 1895, d. 11 JUL 1978)
Note: Addresses
1895 23 Lizban Street, Blackheath, London (birth)
1897 25 Maple Road, Grays, Essex (birth of Minnie)
1901 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1907 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex (birth of William Alphonso and Frank)
1911 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1919 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex (marriage of Priscilla)
1921 Grays, Thurrock, Essex (marriage)
Father Philip WHEATON - Engine Driver
? 329 Rectory Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1927 54 Hugon Road, Fulham East and West, Hammersmith and Fulham, London
At same address was Mrs Jane WHEATON. This was probably the widow of Ada's father's
brother William who died in August 1926
We were told that there was an Aunt "Jinny" who smoked a pipe. Was this her?
Also at the address were Thomas and Maude CHATTEY
1928 54 Hugon Road, Fulham East and West, Hammersmith and Fulham, London
Mrs Jane WHEATON was still at this address
Also at the address were Thomas and Maude CHATTEY
1929 54 Hugon Road, Fulham East and West, Hammersmith and Fulham, London
Mrs Jane WHEATON was still at this address
Also at the address were Thomas and Maude CHATTEY
1931 54 Hugon Road, Fulham East and West, Hammersmith and Fulham, London
Mrs Jane WHEATON was still at this address
1948 2 Roy Walk, Highfield Gardens, Grays, Essex (Present at father's death)
1978 53 Cliffsend Grove, Cliffs End, Ramsgate, Kent (death)
Source: (Birth)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Source: (Death)
Title: Death certificate
Author: Michigan Dept of Health
Publication: Vital Statistics
Note: ABBR Death CertificateCALN July 19 1947
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0400/SLACK 0300
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Event: Type: Informant of Death
Place: Kenneth Arthur SLACK son 43 Ashley Gardens, Little Thurrock, Grays, Essex
Occupation: Place: 1911 Student Part Time
Reference: 00038
Cause: Congestive Cardiac Failurem Jaundice due to extra hepatic obstruction

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WHEATON, Minnie (b. 21 DEC 1897, d. 6 OCT 1989)
Note: Addresses
1897 25 Maple Road, Grays, Essex (birth)
1901 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1907 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex (birth of William Alphonso and Frank)
1911 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1919 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex (marriage of Priscilla)
1920 "Rest Harrow" Cobham, Surrey (marriage to Walter Charles OSBORN)
1930 54 Hugon Road, Fulham, London (marriage to John William FIELD)
1951 40 Laurel Avenue, Potters Bar, Middlesex (death of Mother)
1953 40 Laurel Avenue, Potters Bar, Middlesex
Source: (Birth)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0400/OSBORN/FIELD 0300
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Occupation: Place: 1911 School
Reference: 00041

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WHEATON, William Alphonso (b. 13 JAN 1907, d. 4 OCT 1975)
Note: Addresses
1907 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex (birth)
1911 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1919 2 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Essex (Priscilla's marriage)
? 229 Rectory Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
1940/45 Warboys, Huntingdonshire (stayed with relatives during the war)
1945 8 Roy Walk, Blackshots Estate, Little Thurrock, Essex
1948 Cranbrook, The Esplanade, Frinton-on-Sea, Essex
Source: (Birth)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Source: (Death)
Title: Civil Registration Indexes at Family Record Centre, Myddleton House, London
Media: Book
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0400
Event: Type: Informant of Death
Place: Kenneth Arthur SLACK, Nephew of 43 Ashley Gardens, Little Thurrock, Grays, Essex
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Reference: 00047
Cause: Coronary Thrombosis, Atherosclerosis, Diabetes Mellitus, Blindness

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WHEATON, Frank (b. 13 JAN 1907, d. 15 JAN 1907)
Note: Addresses
1907 1 Whitehall Road, Little Thurrock, Grays, Essex (birth and death)
Source: (Birth)
Title: Certificate
Media: Civil Registry
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0400
Event: Type: Present at death
Place: Sarah BRADD of 9 College Road, Little Thurrock, Essex
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Reference: 00048
Cause: Premature Birth, lived 1 day 6 hours, 7 month twin Atelectasis

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JOHNSON, George Henry (b. ABT 1886, d. ABT 1958)
Source: (Name)
Title: Civil Registration Indexes at Family Record Centre, Myddleton House, London
Media: Book
Source: (Name)
Title: Ken and Gladys SLACK
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0400
Reference: 00036

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WARREN, Jim (b. ABT 1886, d. UNKNOWN)
Source: (Birth)
Title: Approximation
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0400
Reference: 00037

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SLACK, Arthur Michael (b. 18 OCT 1893, d. 7 JUN 1956)
Note: Addresses
1893 27K Beaconsfield Buildings, Islington, London (birth of Arthur)
1903 25K Beaconsfield Buildings, Islington, London (address at baptism)
Parents Walter SLACK - Iron Moulder and Elizabeth.
1901 27K Beaconsfield Buildings, St Mary Islington, London
1911 16 Buckingham Street, Islington, North, London
A sibling of Arthur's was the Head, Frederick SLACK (26). Living with them was their
mother Elizabeth (59) Widow born City of London, John SLACK (23) Librarians
Assistant and George SLACK Engineers Fitter. both born Islington, London.
1921 Grays, Thurrock, Essex (marriage)
Father Walter SLACK (deceased) Ironmonger
1921 87 Randalls Road, Islington, London
At the same address was Elizabeth SLACK
1925 64 Outram Street, Islington, London
1926 64 Outram Street, Islington, London
1927 54 Hugon Road, Fulham East and West, Hammersmith and Fulham, London
At same address was Mrs Jane WHEATON. This was probably the widow of Ada's father's
brother William who died in August 1926
We were told that there was an Aunt "Jinny" who smoked a pipe. Was this her?
Also at the address were Thomas and Maude CHATTEY
1928 54 Hugon Road, Fulham East and West, Hammersmith and Fulham, London
Mrs Jane WHEATON was still at this address
Also at the address were Thomas and Maude CHATTEY
1929 54 Hugon Road, Fulham East and West, Hammersmith and Fulham, London
Mrs Jane WHEATON was still at this address
Also at the address were Thomas and Maude CHATTEY
1931 54 Hugon Road, Fulham East and West, Hammersmith and Fulham, London
Mrs Jane WHEATON was still at this address
1956 229 Rectory Road, Grays, Essex (death)
Source: (Birth)
Title: Birth Certificate
Source: (Death)
Title: Death certificate
Author: Michigan Dept of Health
Publication: Vital Statistics
Note: ABBR Death CertificateCALN July 19 1947
Source: (Baptism)
Title: John Terry's web site 24/2/2011
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: WHEATON 0400/SLACK 0300
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Event: Type: Informant of Death
Place: K A SLACK son 43 Ashley Gardens, Essex
Occupation: Place: 1911 Electrical Fittings Warehouseman; 1921 Assistant Librarian (marriage); 1956 Clerk, (Edible Oil Refinery, margarine makers) (death); 1978 Margarine Manufacturer (death of widow Ada)
Reference: 00039
Cause: Coronary Thrombosis

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SLACK, Kenneth (b. 26 JUN 1922, d. 1 FEB 2010)
Note: Addresses
1975 43, Ashley Gardens, Little Thurrock, Grays, Essex
Source: (Death)
Title: Fred SLACK 5/2/2010
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: SLACK 0300/SLACK 0200
Event: Type: Residences
Place: See Notes
Occupation: Place: Engraver's Artist
Reference: 00040

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OSBORN, Thelma Minnie (b. 6 NOV 1921, d. 29 AUG 2002)
Source: (Death)
Title: Denis STEELE
Source: (Death)
Title: findmypast web site
Event: Type: A Chart Number
Place: OSBORN/FIELD 0300/STEELE 0200
Reference: 00043

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